mytopleft

Thursday, May 11, 2017

The most inefficient procurement system in the world is going to balk at cost for a vastly superior infantry rifle?

The answer is, yeah, maybe:
The Marines are considering arming more of its infantry with a lightweight, highly reliable automatic rifle, but there’s one catch: It costs about three times more than the
The standard-issue M4 carbine could be replaced by the M27 infantry automatic rifle. Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller said the M27s that have already been deployed are “the most reliable, durable, and accurate weapons in our rifle squads,” according to Marine Corps Times.
So, the most reliable, durable and accurate weapon might not be purchased because it costs too much? Maybe, maybe not:
The M27, a variation of the HK416 built by the German gunmaker Heckler & Koch, sells for about $3,000. The M4, which is used by most Army and Marines combat units, is manufactured by Colt Defense and FN America and costs less than $1,000.
To my knowledge, Heckler & Koch does not make guns in the U.S. Colt does, of course, and FN America, a subsidiary of Fabrique Nationale, a Belgian gunmaker, has been making firearms in Columbia, S.C. for more than 20 years. Factor? I don't know. The Marines aren't making anything clearer:
The M27 is said to be far superior to the M4, but Marine Corps Times quoted Neller as saying that while he is looking at a new weapon for infantry Marines, “we have to balance improved capabilities and increased lethality with cost.” But, he added, “our infantry Marines should be the most lethal force we can afford.”
The Corps is talking about arming 11,000 infantrymen with the M27, at a cost of about $33 million. That compares to a cost of about $11 million to give them new M4s. The difference of $22 million in the modern procurement budget is negligible. More gets spent on paper clips at the Department of Defense annually. Not sure what the problem really is, but Marines should have the best combat rifle available, considering what we ask of them.

And now, a little M27 video:

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